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Showing posts from August, 2016

3D Printed Vortex Generators Part 2 (Video)

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3-D printed vortex generators part 2. In this video we step through the installation process and placement of vortex generator version 1-150. We do a comparative analysis from the baseline tests that we conducted in part 1, and provide some analysis of the process. We are using the Quicksilver GT-500 that is currently being used as the tow aircraft for the EMG-6 electric motor glider as the test bed for our 3-D printed vortex generators.

EMG-6 "Shop Notes" August 2016

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"EMG-6 Shop Notes" is a day-to-day accounting of what's going on in the shop with the EMG-6 Electric Motor Glider.


August 29,2016 Jason hard at work making up sub assembly kits. In this picture here Jason has been boxing up elevator Kits.




3D Printed Vortex Generators Part 1 (Video)

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In this video we begin the baseline testing for the 3-D printed vortex generator article. The baseline test was to get a video of the tuft tested wing as a comparative analysis against the additional tests that will be conducted with different 3-D printed vortex generators.

Icom IC-A6 / IC-A24A Radio Mount (3D Printed)

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3-D Printed Handheld Radio Mount
Although originally designed for the a Piper J-3 Cub, hence the color.  This mount can be used on any aircraft including the EMG-6. The radio mount is designed with a split clamp system which allows the installation and positioning on to a 7/8" diameter tube. We can design other size clamps that are interchangeable with different sized tubing if anyone has a specific request. The mounting system requires (4) (3/16" Dia) Cap Head Screws. (4) (3/16") Washers under the head of the cap screw. additionally there is a hex cut out in the clamp that will automatically hold a 3/16" nylon nut. (4) required. Mount can be mounted either horizontal or vertical relationship to the tube.

You can download the STL files if you wish to print your own radio mount. the files are located under 02-90-10-10 ICOM Radio Mount in the builders database.

Link to 3-D printing  STL files.



"Stronger 3-D Printed Parts (Part 1)" Sport Aviation / Experimenter "Technically Speaking" Article July 2016

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Stronger 3-D Printed Parts (Part 1)
With the extensive proliferation of LPD (Layered Plastic Deposition) 3-D printers, their use in experimental aircraft has begun to grow exponentially. One of the most commonly asked questions, is whether or not we can reliably produce structural components using a 3D printer. The answer is an emphatic yes. Just as with any other process or material, it has its limitations as well as its strengths. Learning to utilize the 3-D printer’s strengths and work within its limitations is the key to its successful utilization.

Because the LPD printers are laying down one layer of plastic at a time the resulting component has a “grain” to it.  And much like wood and other materials the direction of the grain can significantly change the structural characteristics. If you have ever tried to karate chop a board, you know the trick is to strike the board along or parallel with the grain. The amount of force required to break the board across the grain can be 10…